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Aug 12 '13

(Source: donniedarkos)

3,581 notes (via andreii-tarkovsky & donniedarkos)

Aug 12 '13

330,347 notes (via olivicat & atomheart-brother)

Aug 3 '13

lapetitemariniere:

Charlotte: I just don’t know what I’m supposed to be. 

-  Bob: You’ll figure that out. The more you know who you are, and what you want, the less you let things upset you. 

(Source: lapetitecinephile)

13,791 notes (via kneesocked & lapetitecinephile)

Aug 3 '13

What other filmmakers and films have been important to you as an artist?
Elia Suleiman: The Japanese filmmaker Yasujiro Ozu and the Chinese filmmaker Hou Hsiao Hsien. They made it possible for me to make movies. When I saw their films, I thought, “These people are so close to me.” When positioning a camera for the first time, you ask yourself, “Should I place it here and not up there?” It is a process of elimination. But it is in that place I feel at home, behind the camera. It is a way of expressing something personal and for something personal this is where you have to do the interrogation. It is a mixture of how I naturally fell into a point of view [with my] camera, very personally, and at the same time this personal point of view identifies with these filmmakers. So a combination of things gave me the faith that I was in the right place.

What other filmmakers and films have been important to you as an artist?

Elia Suleiman: The Japanese filmmaker Yasujiro Ozu and the Chinese filmmaker Hou Hsiao Hsien. They made it possible for me to make movies. When I saw their films, I thought, “These people are so close to me.” When positioning a camera for the first time, you ask yourself, “Should I place it here and not up there?” It is a process of elimination. But it is in that place I feel at home, behind the camera. It is a way of expressing something personal and for something personal this is where you have to do the interrogation. It is a mixture of how I naturally fell into a point of view [with my] camera, very personally, and at the same time this personal point of view identifies with these filmmakers. So a combination of things gave me the faith that I was in the right place.

(Source: goodbyedragoninn)

136 notes (via fuckyeahdirectors & goodbyedragoninn)

Aug 3 '13

Children of Men (USA - UK, 2006)

(Source: in-love-with-movies)

1,228 notes (via yasujiroozu & in-love-with-movies)

Aug 3 '13

(Source: wednesdaydreams)

359 notes (via yasujiroozu & wednesdaydreams)

Aug 3 '13
Well-run libraries are filled with people because what a good library offers cannot be easily found elsewhere: an indoor public space in which you do not have to buy anything in order to stay. In the modern state there are very few sites where this is possible. The only others that come readily to my mind require belief in an omnipotent creator as a condition for membership. It would seem the most obvious thing in the world to say that the reason why the market is not an efficient solution to libraries is because the market has no use for a library. But it seems we need, right now, to keep re-stating the obvious. There aren’t many institutions left that fit so precisely Keynes’ definition of things that no one else but the state is willing to take on. Nor can the experience of library life be recreated online. It’s not just a matter of free books. A library is a different kind of social reality (of the three dimensional kind), which by its very existence teaches a system of values beyond the fiscal.

17,997 notes (via notational & thebronzemedal)

Aug 2 '13
Feminism has fought no wars. It has killed no opponents. It has set up no concentration camps, starved no enemies, practiced no cruelties. Its battles have been for education, for the vote, for better working conditions, for safety in the streets, for child care, for social welfare, for rape crisis centres, women’s refuges, reforms in the law. If someone says, ‘Oh, I’m not a feminist’, I ask, ‘Why? What’s your problem?’
— Dale Spender, Man Made Language. (via uowfreeschool)

58,504 notes (via olivicat & uowfreeschool)

Aug 2 '13
inothernews:

In case you were wondering.

inothernews:

In case you were wondering.

197,588 notes (via ultimatebunny & inothernews)

Aug 1 '13
Cinema is a language. It can say things - big, abstract things. And I love that about it. I’m not always good with words. Some people are poets and have a beautiful way of saying things with words. But cinema is its own language. And with it you can say so many things, because you’ve got time and sequences. You’ve got dialogue. You’ve got music. You’ve got sound effects. You have so many tools. And you can express a feeling and a thought that can’t be conveyed any other way. Its a magical medium. For me, it’s so beautiful to think about these pictures and sounds flowing together in time and in sequence, making something that can be done only through cinema. Its not just words or music-it’s a whole range of elements coming together and making something that didn’t exist before. It’s telling stories. It’s devising a world, an experience, that people cannot have unless they see that film. When I catch an idea for a film, I fall in love with the way cinema can express it. I like a story that holds abstractions, and that’s what cinema can do.
— David Lynch (via blue-voids)

(Source: javierdedios92)

13,620 notes (via mostofusneedtheeggs & javierdedios92)

Aug 1 '13
collectivehistory:

Apollo 1 crew practicing a water landing in 1966.

collectivehistory:

Apollo 1 crew practicing a water landing in 1966.

65,829 notes (via mostofusneedtheeggs & collectivehistory-deactivated20)

Aug 1 '13
of-castles-and-converses:

Damn straight.

of-castles-and-converses:

Damn straight.

(Source: rinielle)

106,057 notes (via mostofusneedtheeggs & rinielle)

Aug 1 '13

dch:

How much planning do you do before you start to shoot a scene?
As much as there are hours in the day, and days in the week. I think about a film almost continuously. I try to visualize it and I try to work out every conceivable variation of ideas which might exist with respect to the various scenes, but I have found that when you finally come down to the day the scene is going to be shot and you arrive on the location with the actors, having had the experience of already seeing some scenes shot, somehow it’s always different. You find out that you have not really explored the scene to its fullest extent. You may have been thinking about it incorrectly, or you may simply not have discovered one of the variations which now in context with everything else that you have shot is simply better than anything you had previously thought of. The reality of the final moment, just before shooting, is so powerful that all previous analysis must yield before the impressions you receive under these circumstances, and unless you use this feedback to your positive advantage, unless you adjust to it, adapt to it and accept the sometimes terrifying weaknesses it can expose, you can never realize the most out of your film.

Stanley Kubrick
July 26, 1928 — March 7, 1999

Jesus Christ, yes.

(Source: strangewood)

5,942 notes (via mostofusneedtheeggs & strangewood)

Aug 1 '13
Michele Catalano was looking for information online about pressure cookers. Her husband, in the same time frame, was Googling backpacks. Wednesday morning, six men from a joint terrorism task force showed up at their house to see if they were terrorists.

Update: Now We Know Why Googling ‘Pressure Cookers’ Gets a Visit from Cops - Philip Bump - The Atlantic Wire

More data  better analysis. The bigger the data set, the easier it is to draw conclusions that ruin lives.

Even if you trust the government to not knowingly abuse their power, this is a great reason to oppose dragnet surveillance. Human error always abounds.

(via stryker)

48 notes (via notational & stryker)

Aug 1 '13

5 notes (via journo-geekery)